The Anglo-Irish Agreement is an agreement between the British and Irish governments. The agreement was committed with the various institutions defined in the multi-party agreement. It also sets out the position agreed by the two governments on the current and future status of Northern Ireland. The British government is virtually out of the game and neither parliament nor the British people have, as part of this agreement, the legal right to obstruct the achievement of Irish unity if it had the consent of the people of the North and The South… Our nation is and will remain a nation of 32 circles. Antrim and Down are and will remain a part of Ireland, just like any southern county. [20] The Protocol on Ireland and Northern Ireland, which is included in the UK`s withdrawal agreement from the EU, confirmed that the Good Friday Agreement must be protected in all its parts. As part of the agreement, the British Parliament repealed the Government of Ireland Act 1920 (which had founded Northern Ireland, divided Ireland and asserted territorial right to the whole of Ireland) and the people of the Republic of Ireland amended Articles 2 and 3 of the Irish Constitution, which asserted a territorial right to Northern Ireland. The agreement contains a complex set of provisions on a number of areas, including: on Friday 10 April 1998, at 5:30 p.m., an American politician named George Mitchell – who led the talks – said: “I am pleased to announce that the two governments and political parties in Northern Ireland have reached an agreement.” The BBC`s Ireland correspondent, Emma Vardy, has a simple guide to the issue. In addition to the number of signatories [Note 1], Stefan Wolff identifies the following similarities and differences between the issues raised in the two agreements:[28] In each house in Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland, a copy of the agreement was published to allow people to read before a referendum in which it was voted. Some commentators have called the agreement “Sunningdale for Slow Learners,” suggesting that it was nothing more than what was proposed in the 1973 Sunningdale Agreement.

[22] This assertion has been criticized by political scientists such as Richard Wilford and Stefan Wolff. The former said that “it`s… [Sunningdale and Belfast] have considerable differences, both in terms of the content and circumstances of their negotiation, implementation and implementation.” [23] The Good Friday Agreement (GFA) or the Belfast Agreement (in Ireland: Comhaonté Aoine an Cheasta or Comhaonté Bhéal Feirste; Ulster-Scots: Guid Friday Greeance or Bilfawst Greeance)[1] is a couple of agreements signed on 10 April 1998 that put an end to most of the violence of the Troubles, a political conflict in Northern Ireland that had erupted since the late 1960s. This was an important development in the Northern Ireland peace process in the 1990s. Northern Ireland`s current system of de-decentralized government is based on the agreement. The agreement also created a number of institutions between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland, as well as between the Republic of Ireland and the United Kingdom. The vague wording of some so-called “constructive ambiguities”[8] helped ensure the adoption of the agreement and delayed debate on some of the most controversial issues. These include extra-military dismantling, police reform and the standardisation of Northern Ireland. The agreement reaffirmed its commitment to “mutual respect, civil rights and religious freedoms for all within the Community.” The multi-party agreement recognized “the importance of respect, understanding and tolerance with regard to linguistic diversity,” particularly with regard to the Irish language, Ulster Scots and the languages of other ethnic minorities in Northern Ireland, “all of which are part of the cultural richness of the Island of Ireland.” The peace process has successfully achieved the violence of unrest over the past two decades.

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Last Modified: December 20, 2020